Question: MATCHING Match the types of health care service with the correct example. 88. Provides health car…

Get help with college essays at Smashing EssaysMATCHING Match the types of health care service with the correct example. 88. Provides health care and nursing care for A. Skilled care facility B. Hospice unit C. Board and care home D. Alzheimer’s unit E. Assisted living residence residents who have many or severe health problems or who need rehabilitation. Provides rooms, meals, laundry, and supervision to a few independent residents. Provides a unit closed off from the rest of the center. This provides a safe setting for residents to wander freely Health care agency or program for people who are dying 89, 90 91.- 92.Provides housing, personal care supportive services, health care, and social activities in a home-like setting. MATCHING Match the types of health care service with the correct example. 88. Provides health care and nursing care for A. Skilled care facility B. Hospice unit C. Board and care home D. Alzheimer’s unit E. Assisted living residence residents who have many or severe health problems or who need rehabilitation. Provides rooms, meals, laundry, and supervision to a few independent residents. Provides a unit closed off from the rest of the center. This provides a safe setting for residents to wander freely Health care agency or program for people who are dying 89, 90 91.- 92.Provides housing, personal care supportive services, health care, and social activities in a home-like setting.

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Question: Please answer the questions below. 1. Do these trends go against the historical roots of US medic…

Please answer the questions below. 1. Do these trends go against the historical roots of US medicine? 2. And if they do, how might they affect the current hospital governance structure? 3. Are members of the medical staff truly independent if they are employees? Reading that goes along with the question above……… Hospital acquisition trends continue to persist, according to a report from Avalere Health and the Physicians Advocacy Institute (PAI), which found that 5000 independent physician practices were acquired by hospitals between July 2015 and July 2016. During the time period, the number of physicians employed by hospitals grew by 14,000, also representing an 11% increase in employed physicians. According to the report, every region of the country saw an increase in both hospital ownership of practices and physician employment. The rate of hospital-owned practices increased between 8% and 47% in every region in the country, and the rate of hospital-employed physicians increased between 5% and 22%. “As payers and hospitals drive consolidations across the healthcare system, it is becoming more and more difficult for a physician to maintain an independent practice,” said Robert Seligson, president, PAI, and chief executive officer of North Carolina Medical Society, in a statement. These trends represent the fourth consecutive year of growth in hospital acquisition of practices and physician employment. Over the past 4 years, the percentage of hospital-employed physicians increased by more than 63%, with increases in nearly every 6-month time period. Regions nationwide saw an increase in hospital-owned practices at every measured time period, ranging from 83% to 205%. Regionally, more than half of physicians in the Midwest were employed by hospitals, and more than one-third of Midwest physician practices were hospital owned in 2016. Rates of employment were lowest in the south, where 37% of physicians were employed by hospitals, and in Alaska and Hawaii, where 33% were employed. “When physicians are employed by hospitals or health systems, they perform more services in a hospital outpatient department setting (HOPD) than independent physicians,” states the report. “The higher proportion of services performed in a HOPD setting increases both costs to the Medicare program and financial responsibility for patients.” According to the report, for cardiac imaging, colonoscopy, and evaluation and management services, Medicare pays more across an episode of care when patients receive services in a HOPD setting. For cardiac imaging, it costs $5148 for an episode of care in an outpatient department, compared to $2862 in a physician office; for colonoscopy, it costs $1784 for an episode of care in an outpatient department, compared to $1322 in a physician office; and for evaluation and management services, it costs $525 for an episode of care in the outpatient department, compared to $406 in a physician office. A recent study published in JAMA Oncology found similar cost differences in the administering of chemotherapy. The researchers found that the administering of infused chemotherapy is increasingly shifting from physician offices to HOPDs and is also associated with increased spending on chemotherapy services for commercial insurers. The Avalere Health and the PAI report builds upon a prior analysis from the partnership that examined national and regional changes in physician employment trends from July 2012 through July 2015. The study found that the number of physician practices acquired by hospitals and health systems increased by 86% during the time period, with the percentage of physicians employed by hospitals or health systems increasing in every region of the country. By mid-2015, nearly 40% of physicians were employed by hospitals and health systems, reflecting an approximately 50% increase during the 3-year period. 2nd reading February 21, 2019 – Hospital acquisitions of physician practices continues to be a strong trend in the healthcare space, according to new data from Avalere Health and the Physicians Advocacy Institute (PAI). In an emailed press release, the organizations reported that hospitals acquired approximately 8,000 physician practices between July 2016 and July 2018. That number is on top of the 5,000 hospital acquisitions of physician practices from July 2015 to July 2016. Overall, hospital acquisitions of physician practices increased by 128 percent from 2012 to 2018, the updated analysis found. In July 2012, only 35,700 practices were considered hospital-owned, but that number jumped to 80,000 practices by the start of 2018. While hospitals engaged in robust acquisition activity, physician employment by hospitals and health systems also dramatically increased since 2012, the analysis revealed. Over the five-and-half-year study period, the number of physicians employed by hospitals or health systems increased by more than 70 percent, growing from 94,700 employed physicians in mid-2012 to 168,800 employed physicians by the start of 2018. During the most recent 18-month period alone, 14,000 physicians left their private practices to work for a hospital or health system. Additionally, researchers found that all regions experienced an uptick in hospital-owned practices at every measured time period. The increase of hospital-owned practices in the regions ranged from 91 percent to 303 percent. “The continued trend of hospital-driven consolidation is dramatically reshaping the healthcare system,” Robert Seligson, PAI’s President and CEO of the North Carolina Medical Society, stated in the press release. “PAI will continue to advocate for fair, transparent policies and champion physician clinical autonomy, regardless of the practice setting, to ensure that physicians can continue to deliver the best possible care to their patients.” In general, healthcare mergers and acquisitions are taking off. PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) recently reported that merger and acquisition activity across the entire industry increased 14.4 percent in 2018, and deals among provider organizations, including hospitals and physician groups, accounted for 28 percent of the total number of transactions. Reducing costs, improving care quality, increasing efficiency, and implementing value-based care are among the top reasons why providers are looking to mergers and acquisitions. Acquiring or merging with another provider organization allows both providers to leverage economies of scale, brand recognition, and other valuable capabilities. In particular, physician practices are drawn to hospital acquisitions. AMGA recently found that the operating loss per physician increased from 10 percent of net revenue in 2016 to 17.5 percent by 2017. As a result, total losses during the two-year period grew from a median of $95,138 to $140,856 per doctor. Merging with a hospital enables physicians to shoulder the financial burden of running a practice in a time when reimbursement rates are falling and providers are under increased pressure to decrease their costs. At the same time, an acquisition allows the practice to take advantage of the hospital’s technological, administrative, and financial infrastructure that would otherwise be out-of-reach for most practices. But hospital acquisitions of physician practices could spell trouble not only for independent physicians, but also the industry at large. A separate Avalere Health and PAI study from 2017 found that the growing number of hospital-employed physicians is behind the $3.1 billion increase in total Medicare spending on four common services. Another study from 2017 also showed that cancer costs were 60 percent higher when patients underwent chemotherapy at a hospital-based versus independent center. “Hospital consolidation pushes healthcare costs upward,” explained Seligson in 2017. “The impact of hospitals owning outpatient practices places a greater financial burden on Medicare beneficiaries and on taxpayers.” It is a difficult time to be an independent physician. Major stakeholders have argued that value-based care and healthcare reform in general are the death knell of the independent physician practice. However, remaining independent is still a viable option for physicians. Groups like PAI are advocating for policies and regulations that level the playing field for independent practices and physicians. The group recently called for increased market competition, more site-neutral payment policies, and small practice support for value-based reimbursement programs like MACRA. Independent practice associations (IPAs) are also looking to help physicians stay autonomous while still leveraging the capabilities of their peers. IPA allow practices to compete with their larger peers and share resources to stay afloat financially. “Sometimes independent physicians are so independent that it’s a detriment to their own survival,” Paul Reiss, MD, HealthFirst’s Chief Medical Officer, recently told RevCycleIntelligence.com. “Whereas joining with other like-minded individuals in similar practice situations creates this energy that allows them to survive.”

Question: Hello, I just need a change to the words for each one of the paragraphs, to say the same thing bu…

Hello, I just need a change to the words for each one of the paragraphs, to say the same thing but with other words. Please and thank you The intestinal microbiota plays a crucial role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis. Changes in crosstalk between the intestinal epithelial cells, immune cells and the microbiota are critically involved in the development of inflammatory bowel disease. In the experimental mouse model, the development of colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) promotes overgrowth of the opportunistic yeast pathogen Candida glabrata. Conversely, fungal colonization aggravates inflammatory parameters. In the present study, we explored the effect of C. glabrata colonization on the diversity of the gut microbiota in a DSS-induced colitis model, and determined the impact of soluble β-glucans on C. glabrata-host interactions. Results: Mice were administered a single inoculum of C. glabrataand were exposed to DSS treatment for 2 weeks in order to induce acute colitis. For β-glucan treatment, mice were administered with soluble β-glucans purified from C. glabrata (3 mg per mouse), orally and daily, for 5 days, starting on day 1. The number of C. glabrata colonies and changes in microbiota diversity were assessed in freshly collected stool samples from each tagged mouse, using traditional culture methods based on agar plates. An increase in Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis populations and a reduction in Lactobacillus johnsonii and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron were observed during colitis development. This decrease in L. johnsonii was significantly accentuated by C. glabrata overgrowth. Oral administration of β-glucans to mice decreased the overgrowth of aerobic bacteria and IL-1β expression while L. johnsonii and B. thetaiotaomicron populations increased significantly. β-glucan treatment increased IL-10 production via PPARγ sensing, promoting the attenuation of colitis and C. glabrata elimination. Conclusions: This study shows that the colonic inflammation alters the microbial balance, while β-glucan treatment increases the anaerobic bacteria and promotes colitis attenuation and C. glabrata elimination. This study aimed to elucidate the genetic relatedness and epidemiology of 127 clinical and environmental Candida glabrata isolates from Europe and Africa using multilocus microsatellite analysis. Each isolate was first identified using phenotypic and molecular methods and subsequently, six unlinked microsatellite loci were analyzed using automated fluorescent genotyping. Genetic relationships were estimated using the minimum-spanning tree (MStree) method. Microsatellite analyses revealed the existence of 47 different genotypes. The fungal population showed an irregular distribution owing to the over-representation of genetically different infectious haplotypes. The most common genotype was MG-9, which was frequently found in both European and African isolates. In conclusion, the data reported here emphasize the role of specific C. glabrata genotypes in human infections for at least some decades and highlight the widespread distribution of some isolates, which seem to be more able to cause disease than others Necrotizing urethritis is a rare malady with only one other case reported in the literature found to be due to an infectious cause. We report a case of necrotizing urethritis caused by Candida glabrata and review all relevant literature to date. The patient is a 56-year-old man with a past medical history significant for poorly controlled insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes mellitus and incomplete bladder emptying who presented to the University Medical Center with perineal pain, fever, and urinary retention. Cross-sectional imaging showed emphysematous changes in the bulb of the corpus spongiosum. After admission, his fever and leukocytosis persisted, and his physical exam worsened with intravenous antibiotics alone. Subsequently, the patient underwent cystourethroscopy with incision and debridement of the corpus spongiosum. Postoperatively, he improved clinically and his spongiosum wound and urine grew Candida glabrata. To our knowledge, we report the first case of necrotizing urethritis caused by Candida glabrata Blood infection with Candida glabrata often occurs in during severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). It complicate severe agranulocytosis has not been reported. Case Presentation: We present a case where a SAP patient presenting with a sudden hyperpyrexia was treated for 19 days. We monitored her routine blood panel and CRP levels once or twice daily. The results showed that WBC count decreased gradually. And the lowest level of WBC was appeared at the 21st day of treatment. During treatment, Candida glabratawas identified as the infecting agent through blood culture, drainage tubes culture and gene detection. During anti-infection therapy, the patient had severe agranulocytosis. With control of the infection, her WBC and granulocyte counts gradually returned to the normal range. Conclusions: Blood infection with Candida glabrata can complicate severe agranulocytosis The present case report described the initial diagnosis of a 25‑year old female with a brain abscess consisting of two lesions 0.2 and 2.9 cm3 in volume. The patient was initially treated with antibiotics; however, 2 months following initial treatment, the patient’s condition deteriorated and she became vegetative. Following transfer to the China‑Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University (Jilin, China) the two lesions had grown in volume to 9.0 and 13.0 cm3, respectively. The results of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and plasma 1‑3‑β‑D‑glucan activity suggested a possible fungal infection. Subsequently, a stereotactic biopsy was conducted, fluid was cultured and itraconazole treatment was initiated. Analysis of cultures confirmed a Candida glabrata infection and antifungal treatment was continued. Shortly following surgery, the patient regained consciousness and the ability to eat and speak. A follow‑up MRI 8 months following biopsy confirmed disappearance of all lesions and no recurrence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first English‑language report of a brain abscess caused primarily by Candida glabrata.

Question: Implications of a Rise in Chronic Medical Conditions Instructions Corisider the following informa…

population and health issues class. Implications of a Rise in Chronic Medical Conditions Instructions Corisider the following information and answer the questions below. In Chapter 10 of the textbook, the authors suggest that slightly more than one third of the people in the United States have at least one chronic medical condition and in four years that will rise to nearly 50%. With that said: a. What are the implications for the individual with a chronic condition? b. What are the implications for the healthcare delivery system? c. What are the implications for how we pay/reimburse for healthcare services? d. What are the implications for national policymaking? Important notice: Your answer should have a minimum of 500 words. Implications of a Rise in Chronic Medical Conditions Instructions Corisider the following information and answer the questions below. In Chapter 10 of the textbook, the authors suggest that slightly more than one third of the people in the United States have at least one chronic medical condition and in four years that will rise to nearly 50%. With that said: a. What are the implications for the individual with a chronic condition? b. What are the implications for the healthcare delivery system? c. What are the implications for how we pay/reimburse for healthcare services? d. What are the implications for national policymaking? Important notice: Your answer should have a minimum of 500 words.

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From the news, research a healthcare organization (other than in attachment 3) which had a HIPAA violation. What was the date, circumstances of the violation, and accessed penalties?

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Calculate the modeled percentage change in covered lives for each age category for Exhibit G.1.

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Question: Urgent!Based on the information provided may you please help me to provide the best answer possib…

Urgent!Based on the information provided may you please help me to provide the best answer possible. Thank you so much!!! After 4 years of Medical school, you start your Internal Medicine residency at Princeton- Plainsboro Teaching Hospital (PPTH) under the guidance of Dr. Gregory House. Dr. House arrives and said Woman, 33 years old,is in ER and she refers epigastric pain with nauseas, postprandial Cam- vomiting and asthenia. Two weeks ago an antibiotic for odynophagia (erythromycin) was prescribed, however she left the treatment after 9 days She does not have fever although she describes dystermia symptoms. Initial physical examination of the patient indicated a soft, depressible abdomen with epigastric and right hypochondrium pain on palpation. Mucocutaneous jaundice. No family history of liver diseases She suffered anxious syndrome and bulimia during childhood. No drug or other prescription medicine. ER performed an abdominal ultrasound, suggested acute cholecystitis with slightly enlarged liver. Based on these findings, ER carried out an open cholecystectomy and direct cholangiogram. It didn’t show any alterations. Anatomopathological examination reported cholestasis and chronic liver disease pre- cirrhosis. The results of laboratory tests (blood are urine): The results of laboratory tests (blood are urine): Reference value Result 6.40x 4-11x 1049 Leukocytes 109 g/L g/L Hematocrit 41.5% 37-47% Hemoglobin 13.9 g/dL 12-16 g/dL 43 x 1049 130-400 x Platelets g/L 1049 g/L PT 34% 80-100% 91.6 mg/dL Glucose 5-110 mg/dL 0.8-1.3 tinine o.8 mg/dL mg/dl Cu serum 331 70-140 (ug/dl) 35-145 Na 136 mEq/L mEq/L 35-145 Na 136 mEq/L mEq/L 3.5-4.5 mEq/L 4.1 mEq/L 20.4 Urea 15-40 mg/dL ALT 129 U/L 5-55 U/L AST 169 U/L 5-37 U/L Cu urine (ug/24 hours) 1510-40 Total Bilirubin 4.3 mg/dL mg/dL Ceruloplasmin 0.15 0.17-0.7 Lipase 128 U/L 13-60 U/L Hepatic C8617 ug/8) 100-35.0 20 104 U Lipase 128 U/L 13-60 U/L Hepatic Cu 867 10.0-35.0 ug/g) Amylase So, what do you think?” Cameron says: “It could be an autoimmune disease, like lupus” Dr. House says: “Finally, a lupus case!!!! Foreman says: “It could be something neurological 55 U/L 20-104 U/L Chase says: “Hepatitis?” Then, Dr. House stares at you and says: “What do you think, rookie?” What do you think? What is your diagnosis for the patient? Justify your answer After 4 years of Medical school, you start your Internal Medicine residency at Princeton- Plainsboro Teaching Hospital (PPTH) under the guidance of Dr. Gregory House. Dr. House arrives and said Woman, 33 years old,is in ER and she refers epigastric pain with nauseas, postprandial Cam- vomiting and asthenia. Two weeks ago an antibiotic for odynophagia (erythromycin) was prescribed, however she left the treatment after 9 days She does not have fever although she describes dystermia symptoms. Initial physical examination of the patient indicated a soft, depressible abdomen with epigastric and right hypochondrium pain on palpation. Mucocutaneous jaundice. No family history of liver diseases She suffered anxious syndrome and bulimia during childhood. No drug or other prescription medicine. ER performed an abdominal ultrasound, suggested acute cholecystitis with slightly enlarged liver. Based on these findings, ER carried out an open cholecystectomy and direct cholangiogram. It didn’t show any alterations. Anatomopathological examination reported cholestasis and chronic liver disease pre- cirrhosis. The results of laboratory tests (blood are urine): The results of laboratory tests (blood are urine): Reference value Result 6.40x 4-11x 1049 Leukocytes 109 g/L g/L Hematocrit 41.5% 37-47% Hemoglobin 13.9 g/dL 12-16 g/dL 43 x 1049 130-400 x Platelets g/L 1049 g/L PT 34% 80-100% 91.6 mg/dL Glucose 5-110 mg/dL 0.8-1.3 tinine o.8 mg/dL mg/dl Cu serum 331 70-140 (ug/dl) 35-145 Na 136 mEq/L mEq/L 35-145 Na 136 mEq/L mEq/L 3.5-4.5 mEq/L 4.1 mEq/L 20.4 Urea 15-40 mg/dL ALT 129 U/L 5-55 U/L AST 169 U/L 5-37 U/L Cu urine (ug/24 hours) 1510-40 Total Bilirubin 4.3 mg/dL mg/dL Ceruloplasmin 0.15 0.17-0.7 Lipase 128 U/L 13-60 U/L Hepatic C8617 ug/8) 100-35.0 20 104 U Lipase 128 U/L 13-60 U/L Hepatic Cu 867 10.0-35.0 ug/g) Amylase So, what do you think?” Cameron says: “It could be an autoimmune disease, like lupus” Dr. House says: “Finally, a lupus case!!!! Foreman says: “It could be something neurological 55 U/L 20-104 U/L Chase says: “Hepatitis?” Then, Dr. House stares at you and says: “What do you think, rookie?” What do you think? What is your diagnosis for the patient? Justify your answer

Question: Using the information in the following tables, calculate and interpret the following rates for ea…

Using the information in the following tables, calculate and interpret the following rates for each of the two cities (include any comparisons between the two cities in your interpretation). Crude death rates per 1000 persons City A (2008) City B (2008) Age Population Deaths Population Deaths < 5 25000 200 30000 300 5-14 15000 30 20000 50 15-24 10000 50 20000 100 25-34 20000 40 20000 80 35-44 20000 100 10000 60 45-64 40000 400 15000 300 65 80000 4000 10000 700 Total 210,000 4,820 125,000 1,590 Crude death rate =          Total # deaths______                                  # persons in population

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